The HOPE Study addressed many aspects of the
patient experience. Below are 3 findings with
SUBOPTIMIZED PATIENTS



Acceptance of
Side Effects

Explore potential
impact

Potential
for Drug-drug
Interactions

Learn about
long-term challenges


Disruptions to
daily routines

Discover effect on
patients

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Acceptance of
Side Effects


Ask Yourself: Could Your
Patients Be Normalized
to Their Side Effects?*


In the HOPE Study—according to suboptimized patients (n=441):

57%

responded that experiencing side
effects of their HIV medication is
something they have gotten used to1

46%

responded that they somewhat agree or
strongly agree that they just deal with the
side effects of their HIV medication
because they feel they have no choice1

Ask Yourself: Do You Believe
Your Patients Skip Doses in
Order to Avoid the Side
Effects of HIV Medicine?*


In the HOPE Study—according to providers (n=300):

56%

responded that their virologically suppressed patients have skipped doses of their HIV medication to avoid side effects1

Ask Yourself: How Do
Your Patients Perceive
Side Effects
Compared
With HIV Itself?*

Ask Yourself: How Do Your Patients Perceive
Side Effects Compared
With HIV Itself?*

In the HOPE Study—according to suboptimized patients* (n=441):

1 in 3

somewhat or strongly agree that side effects of HIV
prescription medicine are worse than HIV itself.1

Yet...

Yet in the HOPE Study:

81%

of suboptimized patients* responded that they are definitely or
extremely likely to continue with their current HIV treatment.1

These results...

These results of the HOPE Study
underscore the need for

continued
communication

with patients about side effects and the importance of HIV treatment

Potential for
Drug-drug Interactions


Ask Yourself: Do Your
Patients Always Inform
You About Other
Medications They Take?*


In the HOPE Study—according to HCPs (n=300):

24%

reported not knowing the average
number of pills their patients take for
other comorbid conditions1

41%

reported not knowing the average
number of OTC medications, including supplements, their patients are taking1

Ask Yourself: Do You Discuss
the Potential
for Your
Patients’ HIV Medicine to
Interact
With Other Pills or
Drugs They May Take?*


In the HOPE Study—at more than half their office visits, 68% of HCPs (n=300)
responded that they discuss drug-drug interactions, 59% discuss their
patients' use of OTC medications, and 62% discuss recreational drug use1

Ask Yourself: Can Drug
Abuse Interfere
With Your
Patients' HIV Care?*

Ask Yourself: Can Drug
Abuse Interfere
With Your
Patients' HIV Care?*

HCPs (n=300) in the
HOPE study estimated that

27% of their Patients

currently have substance abuse problems (eg, street drugs, pain medications, and/or alcohol)1


Did you know that many of the initial ART regimens recommended by the current
DHHS guidelines have the potential to interact with commonly abused drugs?2,3

Disruptions to
Daily Routines


Ask Yourself: How Do
Your Patients Feel
About
HIV Medications
and Their Daily Routine?*


In the HOPE Study—according
to suboptimized patients (n=441):

65%

responded that it is either extremely
important or absolutely essential that
their medication regimen fits well into
their daily routine1

Yet30%

responded that they somewhat
or strongly agree that taking
HIV medication gets in the way
of their lifestyle1

Ask Yourself: Do Your
Patients Make Personal
Sacrifices Due to
Their HIV Medication?*


In the HOPE Study—according
to suboptimized patients (n=441):

54%

somewhat or strongly agree that it takes a lot of
personal sacrifices to manage their HIV1

Ask Yourself: Do
You Believe
Dosing
Can Affect Adherence?*

Ask Yourself: Do
You Believe
Dosing
Can Affect Adherence?*

8 OUT OF 10 HCPs

(n=300) in the HOPE study somewhat or strongly agree that
their patients have difficulty adhering to regimens that don't
fit into their daily life1

*Not a HOPE Study survey question.

Suboptimized patients are those who have HIV RNA <50 copies/mL but reported dissatisfaction with their current antiretroviral
regimens or reported they were satisfied with the regimens but responded to some survey questions that would indicate underlying
dissatisfaction.
See THE DEFINITION OF A SUBOPTIMIZED PATIENT.

OTC=over-the-counter; DHHS=Department of Health and Human Services.

References: 1. Data on file. ViiV Healthcare group of companies. Research Triangle Park, NC. 2. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adultandadolescentgl.pdf. Accessed May 10, 2017. 3. University of Liverpool. HIV drug interactions. http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org. Accessed May 1, 2017.

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Among current medication users who
responded that they were dissatisfied
with their HIV medications (n=512),

69%

OF SUBOPTIMIZED PATIENTS* (n=201)
responded that they've talked with their
providers about their concerns1


 
 
 
 
 
 

Only

22%

OF HCPs (n=300) responded that
patients told them they were
dissatisfied with their HIV
medications1

59%

OF SUBOPTIMIZED PATIENTS*
(n=441) responded that they
usually start conversations about
satisfaction or dissatisfaction with
their HIV treatment1

83%

OF HCPs (n=300) responded
that they themselves usually
start conversations about
concerns, interests, and
satisfaction in relation to their
patient's HIV treatment1

*Suboptimized patients are those who have HIV RNA
<50 copies/mL but reported dissatisfaction with their current antiretroviral regimens or reported they were satisfied with the regimens but responded to some survey questions that would indicate underlying dissatisfaction.
See THE DEFINITION OF A SUBOPTIMIZED PATIENT.

Reference: 1. Data on file. ViiV Healthcare group of companies. Research Triangle Park, NC.